Translate Page To German Tranlate Page To Spanish Translate Page To French Translate Page To Italian Translate Page To Japanese Translate Page To Korean Translate Page To Portuguese Translate Page To Chinese
  Number Times Read : 649    Word Count: 2009  
Categories

Arts & Entertainment
Business
Career
Cars and Trucks
Celebrities
Communications
Computers
Culture and Society
Disease & Illness
Environment
Fashion
Finance
Food & Beverage
Health & Fitness
Hobbies
Home & Family
Inspirational
Internet Business
Legal
Online Shopping
Pets & Animals
Politics
Product Reviews
Recreation & Sports
Reference & Education
Religion
Self Improvement
Travel & Leisure
Vehicles
Womens Issues
Writing & Speaking
 


   

Optimizing Your Garden For Drought Or Water Conservation



[Valid RSS feed]  Category Rss Feed - http://articlespromoter.com/rss.php?rss=96
By : Uchenna Ani-Okoye    99 or more times read
Submitted 0000-00-00 00:00:00
Living in Colorado and being a gardener has been rather stressful in the past few years, as this state has been undergoing a rather difficult drought. The city is imposing watering restrictions which are not giving enough water to lawns and plants.

I've had to renovate my garden to make it more water efficient. Now, because of the techniques I've employed, I'm the only one in my neighbourhood with a garden that isn't completely brown. So if you live in an area that is going through a drought or if you just want to save water, I suggest you use some of these techniques as well.

First, I took out all my plants. The soil I was using didn't retain water very well, so I had to water about twice as much as essential in prescribe to get it to actually absorb into the roots. If you have this same problem, you can fix it by loading the soil up with lots of compost. This not only prevents water from escaping, but encourages the plant's roots to be healthy and able to survive more.

Once I was done optimizing the soil for my new low water consumption plan, I was ready to replace all my plants. I decided that the placement of all my plants would reflect the amount of water necessary to keep them alive. All the plants that don't require much water I laid in on one side of my garden, and then just progressed in the amount of necessitated water to the other side of the garden. As a result of my new arrangement, I don't have to waste water on plants that don't require it as much.

The installation of a drip irrigation system was another move on my part that reduced the amount of water I needed to amply water my garden. The great thing about these systems is that they constantly drip into your plants, so that every single drop is absorbed. With traditional watering systems, ordinarily the roots get too overwhelmed with the sheer amount of water in the soil. Thus, lots just seeps correctly past. This is all taken care of with the drip system.

If you still seem to require more water than you can supply to your garden, you might consider which plants you could replace with less water dependent plants. when you desire a good shrub that doesn't use up more than its share of water, look for Heavenly Bamboo. It is not only tolerant of droughts, but looks rather decorative in any garden. Herbs such as rosemary are useful in preparing meals, and are rarely thirsty.

If you're trying to find flowers that will still be lush and beautiful despite the lower amounts of water, look for penstemon varieties like Garnet, Apple Blossom, Moonbeam, and Midnight. You can attract hummingbirds and butterflies with varieties like Cosmos and Yarrow. The best part about all these plants is that they don't look rugged and withstanding, but they sure are. Your neighbours wont be saying 'Look at them, they downgraded their plants just to withstand the drought. What chumps?' Instead they will be marvelling over how you keep your flowers so beautiful in the midst of the watering regulations.

One of my favourite drought immune plants is the Lavender plant. I could go on for pages about it. A large group of Lavender plants looks unbelievably gorgeous in your garden, and hardly requires any water to flourish. Pineapple sage is another personal favourite. It is a 2+ foot shrub that smells strangely of pineapple. It's another major attracter of hummingbirds, and the leaves are also useful to add taste to drinks.

So whenever you are in the condition I was and you're trading with a drought and perhaps watering regulations, I suggest you try some of the things I've mentioned. Even whenever you're just trying to conserve water or be generally more efficient with it, I think you'll still be able to benefit.
Author Resource:- Uchenna Ani-Okoye is an internet marketing advisor

For further reading please check out: Garden Soil
Article From Articles Promoter Article Directory

HTML Ready Article. Click on the "Copy" button to copy into your clipboard.




Firefox users please select/copy/paste as usual
New Members
select
Sign up
select
learn more
Affiliate Sign in
Affiliate Sign In
 
Nav Menu
Home
Login
Submit Articles
Submission Guidelines
Top Articles
Link Directory
About Us
Contact Us
Privacy Policy
RSS Feeds

Actions
Print This Article
Add To Favorites

 

Free Article Submission

Website Security Test