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Etiquette Rules For Wedding Invitations



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By : Victor Epand    99 or more times read
Submitted 0000-00-00 00:00:00
He has proposed and now it is time to send out wedding invitations to those special people in your life that you want to share this special day with you, but first you must figure out how the wording on your wedding invitations should be done.

There are some generally accepted rules of etiquette that should be followed when you are preparing to send out wedding invitations. For instance, if the father and mother of the bride are the ones that are issuing the invitations, then there is very basic and conventional wording that is used. Your wedding invitations should read something similar to the following.

Mr. and Mrs. John Carl Jones request the honor of your presence at the marriage of their daughter Elizabeth Marie to Mr. Michael John Ryan on Saturday, the eighth of July two thousand eight at three o'clock in the afternoon at First Baptist Church in Doraville, Georgia.

If the bride's parents are divorced, then parent with whom she lives usually issues the invitations. If the mother of the bride issues the invitations and she has not remarried, then she uses a combination of her maiden name and her divorced husband's last name, which would read Mrs. Carson Jones. If the divorced father is the one that issues the invitations, then the conventional name would be Mr. John Carl Jones.

If both of the bride's parents are deceased and the invitation is issued by an older, unmarried sister or brother, then the wording should read something as the following, Mr. Gregory Thomas Jones requests the honor of your presence at the marriage of his sister, Ms. Elizabeth Marie, etc.

Other relatives such as grandparents, an aunt, or an uncle may also issue the invitations if both of the bride's parents are deceased. They should use the same formats as above with the proper relationship changes. If the father or mother is deceased and the surviving parent issues the invitation, then the invitations should read something similar to the following. Mrs. (Mr.) John Carl Jones requests the honor of your presence at the marriage of his or her daughter, etc.

If the father or mother is deceased and the surviving parent has remarried, then remarried mother would use her present husband's name, but the remarried father would use the conventional wording such as the following. Mr. and Mrs. David Lee Carson request the honor of your presence at the marriage of her daughter or their daughter or Mrs. Carson's daughter, etc.

If the groom's family issues the invitations, then the wording that should be used should resemble the following. Mr. and Mrs. Robert Allen Ryan request the honor of your presence at the marriage of Miss Elizabeth Marie Jones to their son Mr. Michael John Ryan, etc.

If both of the bride's parents are deceased and the invitation is issued by an older married brother or sister, then the wording used should be as follows. Mr. and Mrs. Robert James Baker request the honor of your presence at the marriage of her sister, etc.

If the bride and groom issue their own invitations the conventional wording would be as follows. Miss Elizabeth Marie Jones and Mr. Michael John Ryan request the honor of your presence at their marriage.

If either the bride or the groom is in the Army, Air Force, Marines, or Navy the the conventional wording would be as follows if the one is a captain or higher, bride to Captain David William Anderson, United States Army. If one is a Lieutenant, then it should read, bride to Thomas Everet Sween, Lieutenant, United States Army. For non-coms or privates, then the wording would be, bride to Eugene Joseph Perkins, United States Marine Corps. If one of the wedding party is an ensign or higher, then the wording would be, bride to Joseph Perkins, Ensign, United States Navy. Finally, if one of the wedding party is a petty officer or a seamen, then the wording would be, bride to Thomas James Otto, United States Navy.
Author Resource:- Victor Epand is an expert consultant for personalized gifts, invitations, and fine jewelry. Find the best shopping for personalized gifts, etiquette, and fine jewelry.
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