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Information About Goa New Year Celebration



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By : Tarun Jaswani    99 or more times read
Submitted 0000-00-00 00:00:00
The New Year is an event that happens when a culture celebrates the end of one year and the beginning of the next year. Cultures that measure yearly calendars all have New Year celebrations. The most common modern dates of celebration are listed below, ordered and grouped by their appearance relative to the conventional Western calendar. Many cities across the world celebrate the New Year. The celebrations usually include a fireworks display, and other festivities.

London, for example, has a major fireworks display along the River Thames, followed by a parade on New Year's Day. The Gregorian calendar is now used by many countries as the official calendar. This has meant that celebrations for the New Year have become much larger than before.Some countries even consider 1 January to be a National Holiday. 1 January: The first official day of the year in the Gregorian calendar used by most countries. In the Eastern Orthodox Church, the civil New Year falls on 14 January (1 January in the Julian Calendar).

Many in the countries where Eastern Orthodoxy predominates celebrate both the Gregorian and Julian New Year holidays, with the Gregorian day celebrated as a civic holiday, and the Julian date as the Old New Year, a religious holiday. The Church's own liturgical calendar begins on September 1, thereby proceeding annually from the celebration of Jesus' birth in the winter (Christmas), through his death and resurrection in the spring (Pascha / Easter), to his Ascension and the assumption of his mother (Dormition of the Theotokos / Virgin Mary) in the summer.

Because of the division of the globe into time zones, the new year moves progressively around the globe as the start of the day ushers in the New Year. The first time zone to usher in the New Year is just west of the International Date Line. At that time the time zone to the east of the Date Line is 23 hours behind, still in the previous day. The central Pacific Ocean island nation of Kiribati claims that its easternmost landmass, uninhabited Caroline Island, is the first to usher in the New Year. The ancient Roman calendar started the year on 1 March, which is still reflected in the names of some months which derive from Latin: September (seventh), October (eighth), November (ninth), December (tenth).

The year used in dates during the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire was the consular year, which began on the day when consuls first entered office- probably 1 March before 222 BC, 15 March from 222 BC to 154 BC, but this event was moved to 1 January in 153 BC. In 45 BC, Julius Caesar introduced the Julian calendar, which continued to use 1 January as the first day of the new year. In the Middle Ages in Europe a number of significant feast days in the ecclesiastical calendar of the Roman Catholic Church came to be used as the beginning of the Julian year. In Christmas Style dating the new year started on 25 December. This was used in Germany and England until the thirteenth century, and in Spain from the fourteenth to the sixteenth century.

In Annunciation Style dating the new year started on 25 March, the feast of the Annunciation. This was used in many parts of Europe in the Middle Ages, and was the style introduced by Dionysius Exiguus in AD 525. Annunciation Style continued to be used officially in the Kingdom of Great Britain until January 1, 1752, except Scotland which changed to Circumcision Style dating on 1 January 1600. The rest of Great Britain changed to Circumcision Style on the 1 January preceding the conversion in Great Britain from the Julian calendar to the Gregorian calendar on 3/14 September 1752.

The UK tax year still starts on 6 April which is 25 March + 12 days, eleven for the conversion from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar plus a dropped leap day in 1900. In Easter Style dating, the new year started on Easter Saturday (or sometimes on Good Friday). This was used in France from the eleventh to the sixteenth century. A disadvantage of this system was that because Easter was a movable feast the same date could occur twice in a year; the two occurrences were distinguished as before Easter and after Easter.
Author Resource:- Get Night Life Goa


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